Qays’s Corner: The up and coming young Immigration Blogger

My ruminations of 13 May 2016:

 

“It is a matter of personal choice, where having  gone through all that legal training and  acquired  a bit of valuable practical  experience, whether interested  solicitors/lawyers have the gumption to  undertake  legal blogging in their own right. That  is,  with a  view to  appropriately expressing  themselves,  set up  a blog site in their own personal capacity.

 

With so many changes being brought in by  the  UK government in the area of immigration and asylum year after  year,  including  publication   of new caselaw with seeming dizzying frequency,   there will always be  much to write about  either by way of simplification  of the law or  its  critique”- Why are more immigration and asylum solicitors/ practitioners not blogging in their own personal capacity?

 

Qays Sediqi, an up and coming young Immigration Lawyer has taken up the mantle and chosen to independently foray into immigration blogging.  In Qays’s own introductory words:

 

“Qays’s Corner, A dose of Immigration Law

 

My name is Qays Sediqi and I specialise in immigration law. Join me on my journey to raise more awareness on immigration law issues by discussing new immigration policies/regulations/case law”.

 

Enjoy Qays’s first blog post on Victims of Modern Slavery:

https://qaysscorner.wordpress.com/2018/09/09/pk-ghana-the-silver-lining-for-victims-of-modern-slavery/

 

 

Straightjacket effect of MS(Pakistan): The problem of the First Tier Tribunal’s restricted approach to negative trafficking decisions

Would the Tribunal have found themselves in the straight jacket that the Court of Appeal has clothed it with had the Upper Tribunal not “exceeded it’s jurisdiction” or “ overreached itself” as concluded by the Court in The Secretary of State for the Home Department v MS (Pakistan) [2018] EWCA Civ 594?

 

The appeal in MS in the Court of Appeal raised an issue of principle as to the jurisdiction of the First-tier Tribunal and the Upper Tribunal on a statutory appeal under section 84 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 Act to undertake an indirect judicial review of a negative trafficking decision made by the Secretary of State in that individual’s case. In that context, the appeal was noted to concern the scope and effect of the previous decision of the Court of Appeal in AS (Afghanistan) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2013] EWCA Civ 1469.

 

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